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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:04 am 
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I'm heading off on a trip from Thailand to Cambodia (I live in Thailand) and I want to be able to take care of the two things that could strand me in the middle of nowhere. Flat tyres and broken drive belts.

So ... I compiled a list of all the tools needed plus instructions and videos ... copied it all to my smartphone (including vids) and packed the tools under the seat. Ready to go! I'm strapping a spare tyre to the back of the top box as well.

If anyone can see any mistakes ... can you let me know? Anyway, I thought I'd share it here as it may be useful to someone.

Honda PCX Roadside Tools & Instructions
For tyre repair, wheel removal, tyre change, belt/roller change


Change Drive Belt/Rollers
Socket Wrench
Phillips Head Screwdriver
8 mm socket
10 mm socket
22 mm ring spanner
Variator Holder
Hammer?*
Spare Drive Belt/Rollers
How to Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8c1njzv69U

Belt
1. Remove 10 mm bolt in lower plastic skirt near kickstand.
2. Pull up and remove rubber foot rest tread.
3. Unscrew the six screws along the foot rest. (Phillip's Head)
4. Remove lower plastic skirt (see video)
5. Remove the three 8mm bolts from the variator cover. Remove cover.
6. Remove the nine? 8mm bolts from the gear cover. Remove cover.
7. Insert variator holding tool
8. Remove 22mm variator nut. (Hammer too?) (Or use an impact driver if at home)
9. Remove the round outer variator cover.
9. Remove belt/Change belt
10. See steps 6-10 below (Rollers)
Rollers
1. Tuck belt out of the way.
2. Remove cylindrical spacer from centre of variator.
3. Remove inner variator cover. (Careful not to drop the rollers everywhere)
4. Replace rollers.
5. Replace inner cover with rollers, spacer and outer cover.
6. Put belt around variator shaft.
7. Whilst pinching the belt together in the middle, replace outer variator cover and 22mm nut.
8. Start engine (on stand) and test.
9. Replace all the other stuff you took off in reverse order.
10. Ride to pub.


Remove/Change Rear Wheel
Socket Wrench
10 mm socket
12 mm long reach socket
14 mm socket
24 mm ring spanner
Hammer?*
How to Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKGRtcZY1q0

1. Remove Exhaust cover (10mm socket)
2. Remove 2 rear exhaust nuts (12mm long reach socket)
3. Remove other 3 exhaust nuts (14mm socket)
4. Remove exhaust.
5. Loosen the central wing nut (24mm spanner)*+Hammer?
6. Remove shock absorber nut (12mm socket)
7. Remove 2 swing arm nuts (14mm socket)
8. Remove swing arm.
9. Remove splash guard (10mm socket)
10. Remove wing nut and wheel! (24mm spanner)

Tyre Repair
Pliers
Tyre Plug Kit
Cutter/Knife
12v Pump
How to Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpmxWY4I8kQ

Changing Tyre
3 tyre irons
3 rim protectors
Windex
Rag
Spare tyre
How to Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anyY0UO5gqk


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:37 pm 
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Looks like you have done a lot of homework in preparation for your travels. Just one point about changing the tyre if you have to do this - how do you propose 'breaking the bead'. Very often this is the hardest part of the job, particularly with tubeless tyres as on the PCX. If you have not already done this job, I would get some practice in. Of course you can usually make a puncture repair until you can get to a workshop (particularly in Thailand/Cambodia?) so you may not have to worry too much.
I hold my hands up and say that I have not done a scooter tyre swap, but I have done a couple of motorcycle tyres ....... and they were challenging to say the least. Breaking the bead was by far the worst part. I'm not sure whether the smaller rims on the PCX are more difficult than a 17inch motorcycle tyre, but I would be tempted to have a go before setting off.
Whatever you decide good luck. The important thing is to enjoy the trip, so concentrate on the positives and push the possibility of a breakdown to the back of your mind. I think you have done a lot to be prepared, very often it is a case of being 'mentally prepared' for anything that might go wrong!

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:47 pm 
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You can break the bead by carefully dropping the side stand onto the sidewall

Don't forget to pack a corkscrew!!!

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:32 pm 
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Far easier to use a puncture repair kit.
No need to take the wheel off at all.
As for the drive belt, it won't break inside the service schedule mileage of 15,000 miles so you can go right round the whole of Thailand and Cambodia more than once before it will show any sign of wear never mind break.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 7:57 pm 
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tomtic wrote:
how do you propose 'breaking the bead'. Very often this is the hardest part of the job


That does worry me a bit ... as does re-seating it with a 12v pump. Maybe I'll just take a complete spare wheel instead of a tyre ... and do a quick wheel swap. Then get the damaged one fixed in the next town. Probably won't even be necessary and the plug repair kit will do.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:01 pm 
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you you wrote:
You can break the bead by carefully dropping the side stand onto the sidewall

Can you explain this a little more? I don't get it.

you you wrote:
Don't forget to pack a corkscrew!!!

I'm not a big wine drinker ... but is there another use I don't know about?

o_O


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:08 pm 
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gn2 wrote:
Far easier to use a puncture repair kit.
No need to take the wheel off at all.

I'm taking a repair kit too ... I'm just paranoid.

gn2 wrote:
As for the drive belt, it won't break inside the service schedule mileage of 15,000 miles so you can go right round the whole of Thailand and Cambodia more than once before it will show any sign of wear never mind break.


I had the belt break once between Chanthaburi and Korat and it cost me a fortune (and a lot of hassle) to get the bike transported to the nearest Honda shop. The small local workshops don't know how to change it. Cambodians will be the same. Just being a "paranoid boyscout" and being "prepared"

o_O


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 2:58 am 
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keekwai wrote:
...it cost me a fortune (and a lot of hassle) to get the bike transported to the nearest Honda shop. The small local workshops don't know how to change it.

--------------------
There you go, a traditional Cub-style Honda Wave or Dream would be a better bet when it comes to service and durability in rural Cambodia.

Honda's chain of shops is pretty comprehensive in Thailand -- apart from the sticks where you're heading. It's a great idea to be prepaired. Even paranoids can have tyres punctured and belts broken.

Maybe you should just add a pick-up truck on your list of spares and tools ;)

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 3:19 am 
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Well even with a Cub-style Honda Wave or Dream I'd still want to be able to do repairs myself on the spot. Sometimes it's a long walk between little villages.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 3:08 pm 
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Good list! This thread technically isn't to the standards of the How-To subforum though, so I'd like to move it. Since it's about a ride, and includes a really good tool list for anyone traveling, do you mind if I move it to the Rides and Events subforum? I'll even sticky it to the top. :)

I highly recommend you pack some good allen wrenches too, for various random adjustments such as the handlebar controls.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:33 pm 
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keekwai wrote:
I had the belt break once between Chanthaburi and Korat and it cost me a fortune (and a lot of hassle) to get the bike transported to the nearest Honda shop.


The biggest hazard to your drive belt is heat.
CVT belts are air cooled and the intake is drawn through a filter.
If you are riding on loose dusty roads or in wet conditions you need to check/replace the filter regulary because if it gets clogged it will restrict the airflow which can trash the belt very quickly.
So if you absolutely must carry spares and tools, make sure you have some spare filters with you.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:16 pm 
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gn2 wrote:
If you are riding on loose dusty roads or in wet conditions you need to check/replace the filter regulary because if it gets clogged it will restrict the airflow which can trash the belt very quickly.
So if you absolutely must carry spares and tools, make sure you have some spare filters with you.


Loose dusty roads are Cambo's speciality. Thanks for the heads up.


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PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2013 3:30 am 
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Once u have the variator cover off. How does the belt come out? Its really bugging me. I managed to change rollers and went to do the belt and now starting to wonder whether it is essential to remove the nut on the right had bit as well. I dont have an impact wrench. ... any help would be ace thanks
Actually, will post as new topic


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:44 pm 
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keekwai wrote:
...


I love your nickname ;-)

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 2:21 am 
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FritzPinguin wrote:
keekwai wrote:
...


I love your nickname.

-----------------
ขี้ควาย

'buffalo dung'

ขี่ควาย

'ride a buffalo'

More properly, it should be transliterated 'khikhwai'. Maybe he's just counting his buffalos: กี่ควาย. Then again one should say ควายกี่ตัว. There's supposedly a small village in Lopburi named Ban Khi Khwai.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 2:34 am 
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A species of mushrooms or fungi is also called [het khi khwai] เห็ดขี้ควาย in Thai, psychedelic mushroom.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psilocybin_mushroom

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 11:52 pm 
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I can't thank you enough for this post. It might save my wife and I from a lot of hassle. Have a wonderful trip. Ride safe my friend.


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