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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 3:06 pm 
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Hi y'all, nice place ya got here!
I lately downsized from an R75 Beemer. I'm old, now and I still like to ride but, I just don't want the work of the whole "big-bike" experience, anymore. I picked up a '13 PCX 150. Very nice in a lot of ways, chief among them the sheer ease of operation. I'm used to carbs, chokes, points, wet coils, air-cooling, and all manner of apparatus and procedure from my youth. This thing is insane. No "starting procedure". Just turn it on, press start and it just runs. No trimming, no nothing, just ride off with a twist of the throttle. I'm in love (lust), so far, this being the end of the first week for me. I was going through it's maintenance this weekend and I did all the fluids, as I have done for decades each year on my old bike. Oil change isn't terrible, but could be less prone to mess. Rear end, no trouble. The next two fluids are where the crux of this first post is found.
First, the coolant change. I can see the radiator (like a nice heater core) cap and the overflow are pretty conveniently located, though the rad cap is slightly obstructed by the plastic core cover. A small annoyance, given that the cover has to be removed anyway to access the rad's drain plug. It gets interesting at the upper-forward cover bolt. It's blocked from access at most angles and recessed into the cover. I was able to get my medium-deep 1/4 drive socket on it and was able to swing the ratchet okay with a secret handshake. I thought about having to put it back in and decided to take it ALMOST out. I took out the other bolts easily as they are accessible directly. Taking the upper-forward bolt almost out was a good idea as I was able to move the cover back far enough to access the drain plug and remove it(nice time-saver). The coolant change was finished with minimal drama (is that really enough coolant?).
Next up (and this is a LULU), the brake fluid change. This thing has a rather "interesting" braking system. Not much machine to stop, really but there was SOME problem in some engineer's mind that this brake system was conceived to address. I see it as a "solution looking for a problem". I could see it if I only had a left arm. However then the throttle would be a problem(I digress). I saw the two bleed nipples on the caliper and also the two bendy brake lines coming to it. I ordered the manual but I haven't yet received it yet, so, I hit that thar inter-web for some enlightenment. TWO braking systems attached to ONE caliper. WTF?
Here's the best part: The rear system's reservoir (filled with fluid to be changed at least every two years) is buried in a maze of bodywork held together by bunch of clips, screws, secret hooks, and a Masonic seal. They spent a lot on the mounting of the reservoir, too (I'm in engineering and got a chuckle out of that set-up). Honda? Really? A solution looking for a problem with an inaccessible (but essential-service) fluid reservoir. I took a break and searched out a really fine pictoria/tutorial on this forum (thank you, Maddiedog!).
Rear brake flush (as required at two-year intervals): not quite two flippin hours!.

Honda? If you're reading this thread, Please make essential service EASY TO DO. The rear brake system on the PCX150 adds insult to injury. It's an unnecessary set-up, and VERY time-consuming to service.
Now that I've got that off my chest, have any of you thought about a solution to the problem of servicing the "solution-looking-for-a-problem" rear brake system on your PCX's? I'm interested in leaving the system intact, rather than somehow disabling the hydraulic part of it. A nice access port in the bodywork would be sweet. Anyone tried to incorporate one with pix? Depending on how expensive another "dash-surround" panel costs, I might give it a shot.
Thanks fer reading and ride safe!


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 3:23 pm 
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Good stuff....thx....welcome

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 5:12 pm 
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j.d.b. wrote:
Hi y'all, nice place ya got here!
I lately downsized from an R75 Beemer. I'm old, now and I still like to ride but, I just don't want the work of the whole "big-bike" experience, anymore. I picked up a '13 PCX 150. Very nice in a lot of ways, chief among them the sheer ease of operation. I'm used to carbs, chokes, points, wet coils, air-cooling, and all manner of apparatus and procedure from my youth. This thing is insane. No "starting procedure". Just turn it on, press start and it just runs. No trimming, no nothing, just ride off with a twist of the throttle. I'm in love (lust), so far, this being the end of the first week for me. I was going through it's maintenance this weekend and I did all the fluids, as I have done for decades each year on my old bike. Oil change isn't terrible, but could be less prone to mess. Rear end, no trouble. The next two fluids are where the crux of this first post is found.
First, the coolant change. I can see the radiator (like a nice heater core) cap and the overflow are pretty conveniently located, though the rad cap is slightly obstructed by the plastic core cover. A small annoyance, given that the cover has to be removed anyway to access the rad's drain plug. It gets interesting at the upper-forward cover bolt. It's blocked from access at most angles and recessed into the cover. I was able to get my medium-deep 1/4 drive socket on it and was able to swing the ratchet okay with a secret handshake. I thought about having to put it back in and decided to take it ALMOST out. I took out the other bolts easily as they are accessible directly. Taking the upper-forward bolt almost out was a good idea as I was able to move the cover back far enough to access the drain plug and remove it(nice time-saver). The coolant change was finished with minimal drama (is that really enough coolant?).
Next up (and this is a LULU), the brake fluid change. This thing has a rather "interesting" braking system. Not much machine to stop, really but there was SOME problem in some engineer's mind that this brake system was conceived to address. I see it as a "solution looking for a problem". I could see it if I only had a left arm. However then the throttle would be a problem(I digress). I saw the two bleed nipples on the caliper and also the two bendy brake lines coming to it. I ordered the manual but I haven't yet received it yet, so, I hit that thar inter-web for some enlightenment. TWO braking systems attached to ONE caliper. WTF?
Here's the best part: The rear system's reservoir (filled with fluid to be changed at least every two years) is buried in a maze of bodywork held together by bunch of clips, screws, secret hooks, and a Masonic seal. They spent a lot on the mounting of the reservoir, too (I'm in engineering and got a chuckle out of that set-up). Honda? Really? A solution looking for a problem with an inaccessible (but essential-service) fluid reservoir. I took a break and searched out a really fine pictoria/tutorial on this forum (thank you, Maddiedog!).
Rear brake flush (as required at two-year intervals): not quite two flippin hours!.

Honda? If you're reading this thread, Please make essential service EASY TO DO. The rear brake system on the PCX150 adds insult to injury. It's an unnecessary set-up, and VERY time-consuming to service.
Now that I've got that off my chest, have any of you thought about a solution to the problem of servicing the "solution-looking-for-a-problem" rear brake system on your PCX's? I'm interested in leaving the system intact, rather than somehow disabling the hydraulic part of it. A nice access port in the bodywork would be sweet. Anyone tried to incorporate one with pix? Depending on how expensive another "dash-surround" panel costs, I might give it a shot.
Thanks fer reading and ride safe!


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Ride your scooter.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:00 pm 
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j.d.b. wrote:
have any of you thought about a solution to the problem of servicing the "solution-looking-for-a-problem" rear brake system on your PCX's?


Yes, its called LTTTFA (leave the thing the fuck alone)
Did 19000 or so miles on my PCX in three years, never touched it once.
Still worked perfectly.
I think Honda stipulate two years between changes, you can get away with four years, annual brake fluid changes are complete overkill.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:35 pm 
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Yeah, it's two years old, so the brakes would ordinarily be flushed (plus, the fluid was fairly dark). The last time I let that job go for a few years, I wound up with sticky pistons and a ton of white muck to clean from the caliper on the rebuild (on a Yamaha). Here, in Michigan we get high humidity and temps from very warm to below zero. It's generally easy enough to do the maintenance and saves a lot of headache later. My Beemer's ATE caliper and MC are still going strong and sealed after 40 years. That's why I do it. If it doesn't get done and you have no trouble, more power to ya but, Mr. Murphy tends to show up for me at most inopportune moments. I ordered another "dash cover" in color for the princely sum of $17 and change. I should be able to dream up something useful in the way of an access panel. We used to be all about "design for assembly" in my business. Last few years, we've been getting the directive for "design for serviceability". Essential service should be the easiest service. I was fairly blown away when I looked into the front end and saw where they perched the reservoir. They even put in a welded member to do it, like it weighs twenty pounds. Very weird from a company like Honda in my experience.
Thanks for the responses!
Fun, fun.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 7:45 pm 
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I agree with you about ease of access and the lack thereof on the PCX.
Combo brakes are about to become mandatory for bikes and scooters up to 125 in the EU.
A rear disc makes it easier to maintain because the reservoir for the CBS is on the handlebar as normal.
My bikes/scooters get changed every three years or thereabouts, so after year two when the warranty expires I don't bother much about maintenance.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2015 3:58 pm 
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gn2 wrote:
Yes, its called LTTTFA (leave the thing the fuck alone)
Did 19000 or so miles on my PCX in three years, never touched it once.
Still worked perfectly.
I think Honda stipulate two years between changes, you can get away with four years, annual brake fluid changes are complete overkill.

Or you know, stick with the manual. ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2015 5:53 pm 
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gn2 wrote:
j.d.b. wrote:
have any of you thought about a solution to the problem of servicing the "solution-looking-for-a-problem" rear brake system on your PCX's?


Yes, its called LTTTFA (leave the thing the fuck alone)
Did 19000 or so miles on my PCX in three years, never touched it once.
Still worked perfectly.
I think Honda stipulate two years between changes, you can get away with four years, annual brake fluid changes are complete overkill.


Hmm. Gn2 is mostly right (he does have maddiedogs absolute support though so when it comes to liability for stupidity look to them not me). Change the fluid after two years, thee years is a touch marginal. Wouldn't make things dangerous but after a few years you'll be surprised how crisp things feel again

Stop fannying on about oil changes and the turgid argument about grades and synthetic vs semi synthetic and just change or partly change your brake fluid

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 9:56 am 
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Honda didn't design the bike for servicability, for sure.

I think most average riders would just take their PCX to a dealer for brake bleeding or coolant changes, to be honest. Luckily, once you've done it once, it's easy. Now that you've been through that hassle, it'll be simple in the next 2 years.

My PCX has the stock brake fluid in it. It's still clear and works fine 4 years after purchase. I might change it eventually...

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Previously rides: 2005 V-Strom DL650, 1974 Vespa Ciao, 2011 Honda PCX 170 (Takegawa 170cc big bore kit), 1996 Honda Nighthawk 250, 1987 Honda Spree, 2000 KTM 125SX, 2003 Honda Silverwing, 2007 Genuine Buddy 125, 1998 Honda PC800, 2008 Buddy 125 (white), 2008 Buddy 125 (red), 2001 Honda Reflex, 1987 Honda Elite, 1988 Honda Spree, 2007 Yamaha Vino, 2007 Honda Metro, 2x 125cc pure-chinesium dirt bikes
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2015 7:15 pm 
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I noted the darker color of the fluid coming out of the caliper than I saw in the reservoir when I bled them.
I found the top panel available, new in color, for the princely sum of $17.17 US. It was shipped today so I should see it next week. I'm leaning toward opening a hole just larger than the reservoir lid and extending it's perch upward so the lid is graspable.
I think I'll make up an extension bracket rather than cut and weld. Likely the cleanest-looking, reversable tack. I'll post pix when I get through it.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 4:52 pm 
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Just bought a 2013 PCX 150 and did the typical maintenance - oil, coolant and brakes. Front brake was a breeze but the rear CBS brake was a nightmare. Seems like Honda went out of their way to design something frustrating to work on. I've had several Honda's that were very easy to work on and I am not sure I would ever give them any more business. Honda should know better.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:32 pm 
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Not had any service past the 600 - and only done oil so far. Brakes do not seem as nice as when the bike was new but work ok. I wonder, for those saying it was so much easy on other Honda's, well if they did not have CBS then that would be a good reason. CBS is not everyones favorite thing but if it's becoming EU law then Honda got ahead of the game. Perhaps it's not that easy to plumb it in in the limited free space available?

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 10:18 pm 
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Honda could have used ONE reservoir housing. The current set-up reeks of retro-fit/afterthought.


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